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USB Power Lead

0.64
Take power from a PC with this handy USB lead. The lead is 1m long and has pre tinned red and black wires which connect to the 5V pins on the USB plug.

Availability: In Stock.

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(£0.768 incl VAT)
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Take power from a PC with this handy USB lead. The lead is 1m long and has pre tinned red and black wires which connect to the 5V pins on the USB plug. The USB standard allows peripherals to draw 100mA each, which is enough to power an LED or most simple circuits.


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Questions:

Posted by Ned, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 on product USB Power Lead
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    A:

    Hi , This USB cable could be used with a USB wall socket, you would just need to make sure that the resistor used would be suitable for the LED’s.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Wednesday, 1 February 2017
Posted by Lukeabbottluke, Friday, 6 January 2017 on product USB Power Lead
Posted by Arda, Thursday, 15 December 2016 on product USB Power Lead
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    A:

    Hi, unfortunately you wouldn’t be able to use this as an output on the high powered amp kit as it doesn’t support audio signals.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Thursday, 15 December 2016
Posted by Josh, Monday, 24 October 2016 on product USB Power Lead
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    A:

    Hi Josh,

    PICAXE needs between 3V and 5.5V so this would power the circuit without the need of a resistor.

    Posted by Rob Haywood on Monday, 24 October 2016
Posted by Tunde, Friday, 9 September 2016 on product USB Power Lead
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    A:

    Hello, the LED strip requires a forward voltage of 12V’s, a USB lead will provide 5V’s, so unfortunately the forward current wouldn’t be high enough to power the strip.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Friday, 9 September 2016
Posted by Ben, Friday, 11 September 2015 on product USB Power Lead
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    A:

    Yes you could use this lead to power our 5V LED's. Although in theory this should be fine without a resistor, it would be advisable to use a low value resistor, just in case the power output of the USB is slightly higher than 5V’s

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Friday, 11 September 2015
Posted by ADAM, Thursday, 3 September 2015 on product USB Power Lead
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    A:

    This is the USB lead that is used in the white and colour changing USB lamp kit, it would also be fine for the Xylophone project kit as this can run on a voltage up to 5V's.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Thursday, 3 September 2015
Posted by Nathan, Wednesday, 24 June 2015 on product USB Power Lead
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    A:

    Yes, just use it instead of the PP3 clip. Red wire to the  '+' on the board, black wire to the '-'.

    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Wednesday, 24 June 2015
Posted by Kate, Monday, 15 December 2014 on product USB Power Lead
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    A:

    Hi, yes it can. Those ipod charger adaptors output 5V like most phone chargers so that is fine.

    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Monday, 15 December 2014
Posted by Chris Brennan, Friday, 11 April 2014 on product USB Power Lead
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    A: The USB power lead can be used to power an MP3 amplifier and it is something we have tried without a problem. Having said that the amplifier's performance is better at higher supply voltages. This is because it can only amplify to the maximum of the supply voltage before distorting. You may therefore also want to consider out 12V dc supply which works well. This can be found under the 'Power supplies and USB power' section.
    Posted by Matt Macleod on Friday, 11 April 2014
Posted by Chris, Friday, 11 April 2014 on product USB Power Lead
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    A: The 3.5V lamp will have a bit of tolerance in terms of the maximum voltage, however I'd expect that this might be 10% above the rated voltage of 3.5V. It certainly isn't specified to run at 5V, so no it won't work. Depending on the application, you might be better using a white LED as it will use less current and it's easier to operate at the required voltage by means of a current limit resistor. For more details see white LED USB lamp in the related products link.
    Posted by Matt Macleod on Friday, 11 April 2014
Posted by cameron ferguson, Monday, 11 November 2013 on product USB Power Lead
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    A: Hi, yes that would work fine. There is an example of how to do it on this page https://www.kitronik.co.uk/resources/electronic-tutorials/1w-star-led-datasheet/
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Tuesday, 26 November 2013
Posted by Stacey, Monday, 8 April 2013 on product USB Power Lead
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    A: Hi Stacey, Yes that would work fine.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Tuesday, 10 September 2013
Posted by barnaclefred, Friday, 13 July 2012 on product USB Power Lead
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    A: Yes the low inertia motor would be fine to be used with the USB lead, as well as being low voltage it is also low current at about 10mA. The question as to if it would work with our solar cell is a little more tricky to answer. If the application doesn?t load the motor, for instance using it as a fan then it should be fine. However if you plan on driving something where the motor is going to be under a heavier load I?d definitely give it a try before deciding if it?s a good idea. All solar cells are specified to make them look good and if they once managed to do 5V at 50mA then that is what they will be quoted as. You will never manage to get a solar cell to deliver the amount of power the specification suggests it is capable of.
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Friday, 13 July 2012
Posted by Jim Jenner, Friday, 10 June 2011 on product USB Power Lead
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    A: The low torque motor you have suggested is a 3V motor that will work up to 4.5V and the USB port is a 5V port. Something that is connected to the USB port should only draw 100mA unless it has communicated with the PC and negotiated a higher current, in which case it can take 0.5A. The typical current of the motor is 1A so as well as being too lower a voltage it will also take too much current. The other thing to consider is that educational motors are electrically noisy and that PCs are more sensitive, though generally this will be the lower voltage supplies rather than the 5V supply. So in order to keep inside the motor voltage specification and below the USB port current specification I?d suggest using a low inertia solar motor. This will also have the advantage that it is electrically cleaner than the other motors, but it is more expensive. The stock code for this motor is 2506.
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Friday, 10 June 2011
Posted by Andrew Headon, Monday, 23 May 2011 on product USB Power Lead
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    A: The USB interface is a 5v supply and 2 data lines. So if you have a USB device that you need to power it would be possible to use a 5V supply and connect it to the device via the USB port. You are therefore right that with the appropriate adaptor this lead could be used. However DO NOT use a 9V battery as you will damage the equipment that you connect to it. The voltage should be between 4.75V and 5.25V and capable of delivering 0.5A.
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Monday, 23 May 2011
Posted by GarethJones, Wednesday, 13 April 2011 on product USB Power Lead
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    A: The computer USB is a 5V supply. It would depend on the buzzer you had in mind as to whether it would work. The white piezo buzzers we sell are designed to run off a 3 to 24V supply so would be fine. The lower frequency black buzzers are available in a range of voltages and you would need to use a 6V buzzer is designed to work between 4 and 8 volts so would be fine with the 5V from the USB supply. Both types of buzzer take less than 30mA so would be OK.
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Wednesday, 13 April 2011

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