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3.0V 100mA Polycrystalline Solar Cell

1.99
A 3V 100mA (max) Crystalline Solar Cell, finished with epoxy resin making it waterproof. Dimensions: 60mm x 48mm x 3mm. Supplied with 20cm leads.

Availability: In Stock.

Code1+ 10+ 100+
3604£1.99
(£2.388 incl VAT)
£1.79
(£2.148 incl VAT)
£1.55
(£1.86 incl VAT)
OR

This crystalline solar cell is finished with epoxy resin making it waterproof.

Connection is via 2 x 20cm leads connected to the solder pads on the back.

Dimensions: 60 x 48 x 3mm

Voltage: 3V

Current: 100mA max


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Questions:

Posted by John Dines, Tuesday, 7 February 2017 on product 3.0V 100mA Polycrystalline Solar Cell
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    Hi John, After having a look into these batteries it is stressed that the original charger should be used to charge the batteries and you shouldn’t create/use a different charge. As such we aren’t able to provide any further recommendations other than this. Sorry.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Tuesday, 7 February 2017
Posted by Peter Mackay, Friday, 6 January 2017 on product 3.0V 100mA Polycrystalline Solar Cell
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    Hi Pete, We have looked into this via a datasheet and testing this ourselves and unfortunately during winter sun you wouldn’t be able to get the solar cell to output enough current to charge this battery. During direct sun it would be able to, but shaded or indirect sun light wouldn’t be able to produce enough voltage or current. 

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Friday, 6 January 2017
Posted by Chris cain, Monday, 11 April 2016 on product 3.0V 100mA Polycrystalline Solar Cell
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    You could in theory use a solar cell to charge a battery. To charge a 9V battery you would want to us 2 5V solar cells, https://www.kitronik.co.uk/3608-50v-130ma-polycrystalline-solar-cell.html connected in series along with your diode. This will drop the voltage from 10V’s to around 9.3V’s, and depending on the capacity of the battery would depend on the length of time it would take to charge.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Monday, 11 April 2016
Posted by Dave, Friday, 26 February 2016 on product 3.0V 100mA Polycrystalline Solar Cell
Posted by Peter Brown, Tuesday, 10 November 2015 on product 3.0V 100mA Polycrystalline Solar Cell
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    The maximum that can be outputted is 100mA, however this requires direct and constant sunlight. You will likely measure less than this depending on the intensity of the sun.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Tuesday, 10 November 2015
Posted by Melanie, Tuesday, 20 October 2015 on product 3.0V 100mA Polycrystalline Solar Cell
  • 1
    vote
    A:

    You would need to connect the solar cells to some rechargeable batteries these would then be connected to the Arduino and LEDs. You would also need to use a diode to stop the batteries discharging through the solar cell when it gets dark.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Tuesday, 20 October 2015
Posted by Miss H Akhtar, Friday, 11 September 2015 on product 3.0V 100mA Polycrystalline Solar Cell
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    Ordinary light bulbs will only run from alternating current, batteries supply direct current and as such you wouldn’t be able to create this circuit.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Friday, 11 September 2015
Posted by Lewis, Tuesday, 14 October 2014 on product 3.0V 100mA Polycrystalline Solar Cell
  • 0
    vote
    A: It wouldn't charge it. The main reason being the cell is 3V and an iPad charger uses 5V. I would advise you not to try to modify a charger for such a device as there's a good chance you could end up destroying your iPad or even starting a fire. These devices all use Lithium type batteries which are known to catch fire if charged incorrectly or otherwise damaged.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Tuesday, 14 October 2014
Posted by Barry, Monday, 28 April 2014 on product 3.0V 100mA Polycrystalline Solar Cell
  • 0
    vote
    A: Pmax (the maximum power the cell can provide) will decay by about 10% every 10 years. Of course this is effected by things such as temperature and weather exposure so your mileage may vary, but they last a pretty long time and slowly lose efficiency rather than outright failing.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Thursday, 1 May 2014
Posted by Dan, Wednesday, 23 April 2014 on product 3.0V 100mA Polycrystalline Solar Cell
  • 0
    vote
    A: The panels are fairly water resistant as they are coated in an epoxy resin. 4 cells in series gives 12V yes. Two groups of 4 could also be put in parallel for more current. Please remember though that the current rating of the solar cells is an ideal maximum under perfect conditions. In reality you get a lot less.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Wednesday, 23 April 2014

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