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1W Warm White Power LED Star

1.65
Energy efficient yet rich in light productivity: the 1W White Power LED is mounted on a PCB star to draw heat from the LED and extend its operational life

Availability: In Stock.

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3547£1.65
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(£1.86 incl VAT)
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These power LED stars offer an extremely high light output in an energy efficient way. The power LED comes mounted on to special PCB star that acts to draw heat away from the LED, therefore extending it operational life. This makes them perfect for many lighting applications, a datasheet can be viewed detailing a few options.

Forward Voltage: 3.0V - 3.4V
Angle: 110deg
Luminous Intensity: 45000mCd
Colour Temp: 2700K - 3300K
star_LED_thumb
How to Use 1W Star LED
Learn how to use a 1W Star LED in our easy to follow tutorial.

Questions:

Posted by phill palmer, Thursday, 26 January 2017 on product 1W Warm White Power LED Star
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    A:

    Hi Phill, With regards to using a potentiometer to dim an LED you would only be able to dim a small section of what the LED emits, as such you would likely have the LED on, it would then dim slightly and then go off as you turn the potentiometer. If you wished to try this circuit you would need to use the following potentiometer, 3005-50R, https://www.kitronik.co.uk/c3005-wirewound-potentiometer.html

    You would connect this in series with the two power LED stars, and then put the 10 Ohm power resistor in parallel with the 2 LED stars and potentiometer.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Thursday, 26 January 2017
Posted by Chris, Friday, 6 May 2016 on product 1W Warm White Power LED Star
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    A:

    Unfortunately you wouldn’t be able to use a coin cell battery to power this, the LED star draws 310mA and the coin cell batteries can only supply 200mA.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Friday, 6 May 2016
Posted by Keith, Tuesday, 9 February 2016 on product 1W Warm White Power LED Star
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    A:

    The following link explains how you would need to connect this up, also it explains a little more into how it works, https://www.kitronik.co.uk/blog/how-to-make-a-battery-operated-dimmer-light-project/

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Tuesday, 9 February 2016
Posted by Tyler Blackborough, Monday, 8 February 2016 on product 1W Warm White Power LED Star
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    A:

    It would depend on the current of the supply, and also the current that the electromagnet uses. You might get some back EMF from the electromagnet, so it would be worth putting a beefy blocking diode in line with the LEDs

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Monday, 8 February 2016
Posted by Sanj Singh, Wednesday, 26 August 2015 on product 1W Warm White Power LED Star
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    A:

    Yes you can use a battery to power the LED, you can power it from either AA batteries or a Polymer Lithium Ion Battery. This would give you around 3 hours of battery life. It would still be recommended to use a resistor, and this would depend on the batteries you wanted to use.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Wednesday, 26 August 2015
Posted by Douglas Grainger, Monday, 20 October 2014 on product 1W Warm White Power LED Star
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    A: Yes, if you are using a mobile phone charger as the power source and it's rated to at least 1A you can light 2 of them safely if wired in parallel with a 10R 2.5W power resistor each. If you are plugging the kit into a computer though you don't want to do this as it may damage your USB socket.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Monday, 20 October 2014
Posted by simon wood, Tuesday, 27 May 2014 on product 1W Warm White Power LED Star
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    A: You could try a 1W or 3W LED star with appropriate power resistor. (check the resources page if you aren't sure) and a mono amp kit. (not the pre-built ones, they have SMT bits that cant be transplanted easily.) You could run all this from a 12V 1A power supply.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Tuesday, 27 May 2014
Posted by Phil Palmer, Monday, 28 April 2014 on product 1W Warm White Power LED Star
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    A: Yes you can do this, you will want to use the potentiometer as well as the resistor mentioned in the data sheet. That way when the potentiometer is set to 0 ohms the LED will still be protected. You should use a potentiometer with a suitable power rating. https://www.kitronik.co.uk/products/components/resistors/metal-shaft-linar-potentiometers/10k-16mm-linear-potentiometer/ this one is ok. If you need a circuit diagram to help show how to wire it up let me know.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Saturday, 3 May 2014
Posted by Kevin Tulliver, Monday, 3 December 2012 on product 1W Warm White Power LED Star
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    A: The LEDs have a forward voltage of 3.2V per LED so if you put 2 LEDs in series then they will have an overall voltage of 6.4V. I don?t know how much above 6V the dynamo will be under load, so you would want to test this. The two LEDs would take a total of 1W so if you repeated this three times then then you would need 3W and the dynamo you mention is 3.5W so yes if you connect 3 lots of 2 series LEDs together then it should be fine. I?d just make sure with a multimeter that the current going in to each LED is within the rated amount (1W, 3.2V = 300mA), if not then you should use a power current limit resistor.
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Monday, 3 December 2012
Posted by Nathan Dundas, on product 1W Warm White Power LED Star
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    Hi Nathan, It is very difficult to comment on if the IPhone charger would be suitable as we don’t have any information regarding this. For the 1W LED star we have three recommend power options that can be viewed here, https://www.kitronik.co.uk/blog/how-to-use-1w-star-led/. The key points to bear in mind when selecting your power supply is it must be able to deliver 310mA per 1W LED star and the correct power resistor must be used depending on the supply voltage and number of LED stars your using.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Wednesday, 26 April 2017

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