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Electro-Fashion conductive thread, 50 yards/ 45m

7.95
Conductive thread can be used like conventional sewing thread, however it electrically conducts allowing electronics to be integrated into textiles. 45m length.

Availability: In Stock.

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2722£7.95
(£9.54 incl VAT)
£6.70
(£8.04 incl VAT)
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Product description:

This is Kitronik's very own Electro-Fashion® branded Conductive Thread and we think it is among the best conductive thread available. It is perfect for hand sewing and can also be used on the bottom bobbin of a sewing machine (this will require the thread to be wound on to the smaller bottom bobbin first).

Conductive thread can be used like conventional sewing yarn, however it electrically conducts allowing electronics to be integrated into textiles. This makes it ideal for use in a range of e-textile applications.

The thread is nano plated with silver to make it conductive. The conductive thread has a low resistance of approximately 40 Ohms per metre. This allows LEDs to be powered over quite large distances. Resistance does not vary significantly from one length of thread to the next, so you should be able to use this thread without concern for "dead" sections.

The conductive thread has a breaking strain of around 9.3 pounds (4.2 kilos). It comprises roughly 96 individual filaments, each coated with a micron-thick layer of natural silver. This plating of the yarn is done in Europe to ensure as high a quality finish as possible. In construction, 16 of these filaments are wound together to form an initial twist; two of these twists are then twisted together, and finally three of these twists are combined to form the finished thread. The conductive thread is approximately 18 denier. It is heavier than a regular sewing thread, but not as heavy as an upholstery thread. It can be sewn on most domestic sewing machines using either a regular needle or the next size up. This thread does not fray.

Features:

  • No (or very low) fray.
  • Conductivity = approximately 40Ω per metre.
  • Count = 875 dTex.
  • Strength 3000 cN.
  • Elongation at break = 37%.
  • Twist = 240Z-380S.

Contents:

  • 1 x Reel Electro-Fashion®, Conductive Thread, 50 yards / 45m.

Resources:

Conductive Thread demo
Video Conductive Thread Demo
Conductive Thread demo video.
Ask Kitronik E-Textiles Product Tutorial
Video E-Textiles Product Tutorials
A video about our Electro-Fashion range taken from our Ask Kitronik Live event 2012.
be_my_valentine_magnetic_hearts_thumb
How to Make Valentine Magnetic Hearts
Learn how to make Valentine Magnetic Hearts using conductive thread in our easy to follow tutorial.
etextiles_choosing_a_needle_thumb
Getting Started with E-Textiles: Choosing a Needle
Unsure of which needle to use with our conductive thread? This quick guide will help you choose the right needle.
add_sewable_LEDs_to_Easter_Bunny_ears_800_01
How to Add Sewable LEDs to Easter Bunny Ears
Learn how to how to add sewable LEDs to Easter Bunny Ears in our easy to follow tutorial.
etextiles_threading_a_needle_thumb
Getting Started with E-Textiles: Threading a Needle
Learn how to quickly and easily thread needles with conductive thread.
thread_thumb
How Conductive Thread Works
Using conductive thread and how it works.
etextiles_starting_to_sew_thumb
Getting Started with E-Textiles: Starting to Sew
Learn how to start sewing your E-Textiles circuit in our easy to follow tutorial.
how_to_use_a_magentic_switch_thumb
How to Use the Magnetic Switch in an E-Textile Circuit
Learn how to add a magnet switch to an E-Textiles circuit in our easy to follow tutorial.
etextiles_finishing_off_stitches_thumb
Getting Started with E-Textiles: Finishing off Your Stitches
Learn how to finish off E-Textile stitches in our easy to follow tutorial.
thread_winding_machine_hack_thumb
Our Conductive Thread Winding Machine Hack!
Our Thread Winding Machine has been designed to measure and wind a piece of conductive thread neatly around an Electro-Fashion bobbin, find out how!
backpack_cover_with_light_sensor_thumb
How to Make a Backpack Cover with a Light Sensor
Learn how to make a backpack cover with a light sensor in our easy to follow tutorial.
circuit_using_standard_led_thumb
Getting Started with E-Textiles: Basic Circuit with Standard LED
Learn how to use a through hole LED in a simple E-Textiles circuit in our easy to follow tutorial.
led_brooch_image_thumb
How to Make an LED Brooch with a Magnet Switch
Learn how to make an LED Brooch with a magnet switch in our easy to follow tutorial.
circuit_using_pcb_led_thumb
Getting Started with E-Textiles: Basic Circuit with a PCB LED
Learn how to add a Sewable PCB LED to a simple E-Textiles circuit in our easy to follow tutorial.
etextiles_leds_through_fabric_thumb
Getting Started with E-Textiles: Positioning LEDs Through Fabric
Learn how to position LEDs through fabric in our easy to follow tutorial.
be_seen_be_safe_armband_thumb
How to Make a ‘Be Seen, Be Safe’ Armband
Learn how to make a 'Be Seen, Be Safe' LED Armband using conductive thread in our easy to follow tutorial.
ef_fault_finding
Fault Finding in E-Textiles
Common faults that can stop your final circuit from working.
Electro_Fashion_FAQs2
E-Textiles: the Frequently Asked Questions!
So, you have a few questions about E-Textiles - here's a few of our frequently asked questions relating to conductive thread, LEDs, coin cells and how to take care of your wearables.
etextiles_basic_stitches_thumb
Getting Started with E-Textiles: Basic Stitches
Learn about basic E-Textiles stitches in our easy to follow tutorial.
electro_fashion_sewable_lights_thumb
New Product Update: New Electro-Fashion Sewable Light Kits
These new E-Textiles kits from Kitronik have been specially designed so that electronics can easily be used in textile applications - without soldering!
how_to_make_a_basic_e_textile_circuit_thumb
How to Make a Basic E-Textile LED Circuit
Learn how to create a basic E-Textile LED circuit in our easy to follow tutorial.

Questions:

Posted by Catriona Walker, Wednesday, 5 July 2017 on product Electro-Fashion conductive thread, 50 yards/ 45m
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    Hi Catriona, after performing some tests we recommend a current of 250mA, with a maximum current of 500mA being passed through the thread. At 500mA the thread began to get warm, however this was only warm and not hot, as such this would still be a safe working current.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Tuesday, 9 May 2017
Posted by Dave Hunt, Thursday, 9 July 2015 on product Electro-Fashion conductive thread, 50 yards/ 45m
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    You can't solder the conductive thread, it would just burn if you tried to solder it.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Thursday, 9 July 2015
Posted by andrew, Wednesday, 1 October 2014 on product Electro-Fashion conductive thread, 50 yards/ 45m
  • 0
    vote
    A: Hi, that depends on the voltage of the battery, but realistically the thread would burn up before allowing high enough voltages to give a shock.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Wednesday, 1 October 2014
Posted by Scott Wheeler, Friday, 19 September 2014 on product Electro-Fashion conductive thread, 50 yards/ 45m
  • 0
    vote
    A: Hi, we may be able to sell it in higher quantities, it depends on how much you require. If you email me some details (how much you are looking for etc.) at support@kitronik.co.uk I will see what I can do.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Friday, 19 September 2014
Posted by Simona Vasile, Friday, 5 September 2014 on product Electro-Fashion conductive thread, 50 yards/ 45m
  • 0
    vote
    A: Hi, it is cotton. It's impregnated with silver though so it has a shiny grey appearance. It's still completely soft and feels like regular cotton.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Friday, 5 September 2014
Posted by Amy Ilic, Thursday, 19 June 2014 on product Electro-Fashion conductive thread, 50 yards/ 45m
  • 0
    vote
    A: It might work to some degree, aluminium foil would do the job better. Lower resistance and more homogeneous.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Thursday, 19 June 2014
Posted by Zee, Tuesday, 17 June 2014 on product Electro-Fashion conductive thread, 50 yards/ 45m
  • 0
    vote
    A: Hi, the brightness is limited by the current. Current is I = V/R so to increase the current you can increase the voltage or lower the resistance. Raising the voltage will put more power through the thread though and that will cause it to heat up and eventually burn out. The solution is, as you identified, to lower the resistance by adding more threads. Each time you double the distance to the battery you double the resistance, which can be counteracted by using twice as much thread. (2 threads instead of 1, or 4 threads instead of 2). Balancing them perfectly would be quite difficult though.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Tuesday, 17 June 2014
Posted by Sam, Friday, 6 June 2014 on product Electro-Fashion conductive thread, 50 yards/ 45m
  • 0
    vote
    A: No the thread is a cotton-silver blend. I don't know the exact diameter of the filaments. The diameter of the thread is about 1mm and there are 96 filaments in it so that would give a filament diameter of approximately 0.01mm
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Friday, 6 June 2014
Posted by Liz, Tuesday, 22 April 2014 on product Electro-Fashion conductive thread, 50 yards/ 45m
  • 0
    vote
    A: Yes, just sew it into the fingertips to make little 'pads' of conductive thread. I've tested this myself :)
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Tuesday, 22 April 2014
Posted by Rachel McCrafty, Friday, 11 April 2014 on product Electro-Fashion conductive thread, 50 yards/ 45m
  • 0
    vote
    A: Corrosion will depend on the environment the thread is in. I've never noticed any corrosion from the thread on our shelves. I don't have any data about the thread being repeatedly washed or exposed to the elements though.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Wednesday, 28 May 2014
Posted by becca rose, Thursday, 12 September 2013 on product Electro-Fashion conductive thread, 50 yards/ 45m
  • 0
    vote
    A: The resistance of the thread is approximately 40ohms/metre or 12.2 ohms/foot
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Thursday, 12 September 2013

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