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Solar Garden Light with Battery

6.8
Exclusive to Kitronik
Teaching Notes
Key Stage 3
During the day, the solar panel charges a AA battery. When it goes dark, the board automatically switches from charging the battery to illuminating the LED.

Out of stock. Orders can be placed and will be despatched once in stock.

Code1+ 5+ 50+
2134£6.80
(£8.16 incl VAT)
£5.40
(£6.48 incl VAT)
£4.80
(£5.76 incl VAT)
OR

Build you own DIY "Sun Jar" with our Solar Garden Light Kit. is an interesting project that uses sustainable energy to illuminate a white LED. During the day the solar panel charges an AA battery, then when it goes dark the board automatically switches from charging the battery to illuminating the LED.

The solar panel is resin encapsulated and therefore waterproof. You will need to make a waterproof enclosure for the rest of the parts. Alternatively the board has been shaped so that it will fit into an old jar.

Features:

  • Waterproof solar panel.
  • Automatically switches on when dark.

Contents:

Dimensions:

  • Length: 56mm.
  • Width: 44mm.

Requires:

Resources:

This kit is supplied in a grip seal bag. It is also available in retail packaging. For more details on this version click here.

Free samples:

Teachers can order a sample of this kit (one per school) here. You will need to select the kit from a list of all the sample kits; the stock code for this kit is 2134.
Note: this service is only offered to schools for evaluation purposes only.

Buy British:

 This kit is designed and manufactured in the UK by Kitronik.


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Questions:

Posted by Joshua Warner, Monday, 21 November 2016 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    Hi Joshua, This kit uses a solar cell to charge a 1x AA battery, which would be 1.2V’s. There is then additional items within the kit to enable the 3V LED to receive enough voltage to turn on. Page 7 of the following document explains how this works further, https://www.kitronik.co.uk/pdf/2134_solar_garden_night_light_essentials_2_0.pdf, paragraph 4 and 5. As such it is unlikely to work combining two together. Your best solution would be to combine either a large solar cell or number of solar cells to charge a set of 4 rechargeable batteries which then supplies the power to the LED, you would need to also use a diode to stop the batteries discharging into the solar cell(s).

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Monday, 21 November 2016
Posted by MikeW, Wednesday, 22 June 2016 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    If you only need 1.2V to power an LED then a rechargeable battery will give you around 1.2V so you wouldn’t need anything in the way of a circuit to drive an LED (except possibly a small current limit resistor). However this would be on permanently and I suspect that you only want it to be on at night, which would require the addition of a transistor to switch it when the voltage of the solar cell drops. We don’t however have this much simpler version of the kit.

    Whilst it would be possible to change the current limit resistor on the current and use a different lower voltage LED this circuit would be very inefficient as a large amount of the battery capacity would be wasted through the resistor.


    To answer your original question no we don’t have an alternative kit.

    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Wednesday, 22 June 2016
Posted by Steve Barnes, Friday, 29 April 2016 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    We only sell a very limited number of the kits in a pre-built version and unfortunately this is not one of them.

     

    If you did want to give it a try we have a number of resources on the website to help with soldering techniques. Have a look at:

    www.kitronik.co.uk/blog/electronics-skills/

    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Friday, 29 April 2016
Posted by Pete, Monday, 16 November 2015 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    The solar garden kit isn't the best kit to do this with. It has some quite complicated LED drive circuitry in it that boosts the voltage output of the battery at the expense of turning off and on many times a second. Instead I would recommend using a light activated switch kit. If you needed the solar power aspect you can create a solar battery recharger with 4xAA rechargeable batteries and 2x 3V 100mA solar cells with a diode to stop the batteries emptying back through the solar cell. The solar cell that is used in the circuit is a 3V solar cell, with 50mA maximum, however you would likely expect around 15mA in the UK. https://www.kitronik.co.uk/3603-solar-cell-as-used-in-garden-light.html 

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Monday, 16 November 2015
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    The solar garden kit isn't the best kit to do this with. It has some quite complicated LED drive circuitry in it that boosts the voltage output of the battery at the expense of turning off and on many times a second. Instead I would recommend using a light activated switch kit. If you needed the solar power aspect you can create a solar battery recharger with 4xAA rechargeable batteries and 2x 3V 100mA solar cells with a diode to stop the batteries emptying back through the solar cell. The solar cell that is used in the circuit is a 3V solar cell, with 50mA maximum, however you would likely expect around 15mA in the UK. https://www.kitronik.co.uk/3603-solar-cell-as-used-in-garden-light.html 

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Monday, 16 November 2015
Posted by Martin, Thursday, 24 September 2015 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    Hi, it isn't possible to use this circuit to do this, it has been carefully designed to work on powering one LED which requires 3V from one battery which supplied 1.2V. Without knowing more information regarding the solar cell and LED used in the circuit you have it would be difficult to suggest a solution.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Thursday, 24 September 2015
Posted by Roger Mills, Monday, 10 August 2015 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
Posted by tim, Tuesday, 30 June 2015 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    Yes you can connect a solar panel directly to the LED via a resistor, however you must ensure you select the correct resistor for the LED that you want to use.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Tuesday, 30 June 2015
Posted by Andy Budzak, Monday, 23 March 2015 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    Hi, it isn't possible to use this circuit to do this, it has been carefully designed to work on powering one LED which requires 3V from one battery which supplied 1.2V.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Monday, 23 March 2015
Posted by Clara, Wednesday, 21 January 2015 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    Unfortunately this is the only solar light kit we do, and it doesn’t come in a prebuilt version.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Wednesday, 21 January 2015
Posted by Akeem, Tuesday, 20 January 2015 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    When the output of the solar cell drops below a certain output, the board automatically switches to turn the LED on.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Tuesday, 20 January 2015
Posted by Mike, Thursday, 27 November 2014 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    Hi, the solar garden kit isn't the best kit to do this with. It has some quite complicated LED drive ciruitry in it that boosts the voltage output of the battery at the expense of turning off and on many times a second. This would likely upset the drive circuitry of a buzzer. Instead I would reccomend using a light activated switch kit. If you needed the solar power aspect you can create a solar battery recharger with 4xAA rechargable batteries and 2x 3V 100mA solar cells with a diode to stop the batteries emptying back through the solar cell. If you need a circuit diagram for this please email me at support@kitronik.co.uk

    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Thursday, 27 November 2014
Posted by Joseph, Monday, 22 September 2014 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A: Hi, it produces 3V.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Monday, 22 September 2014
Posted by Ekpamaku, Monday, 11 November 2013 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A: Hi, the solar cell delivers a very low current so overcharging is not really a concern if the battery is discharged through the LED at night. It could theoretically overcharge the battery, but this would take many days of charging without being discharged.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Monday, 11 November 2013
Posted by ben, Thursday, 28 June 2012 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A: You could parallel up 5 solar cells and use them with something else. However most of the circuit is involved in switching the LEDs on and off. All you need to charge the battery is a diode to stop the current flowing back in to the solar cell at night. I suspect you might be better buy solar cells on their own. You have miss typed you Email address if you Email support I can give you more info.
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Thursday, 28 June 2012
Posted by Ian Boulton, Tuesday, 8 May 2012 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A: The active section of the cell is the part in the middle, with the silver lines, there is a section around the edge which is not electrically part of the solar cell. So yes, as long as you are careful it would be possible to remove the corners on the solar cell.
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Tuesday, 8 May 2012
Posted by Alan Rowse, Thursday, 23 February 2012 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A: It wouldn?t surprise me that you are struggling to get the circuit to simulate. Both circuit wizard and crocodile clips have in my experience been poor at modelling circuits where the voltages are rapidly changing, which is the case in this circuit. I should however point out that when voltages change slowly the software simulates it very well. Since this circuit runs off a 1.5V battery and the LED needs 3.5V the circuit switches the LED on and off many times a second. When the LED is off power is pumped in to the inductor, this is then used to increase the voltage feed in to the LED but for a shorter time. Because all this is happening very quickly and the software models it sampling the voltages at a slower rate it doesn?t simulate. Unfortunately I don?t have the software to try this, however I suspect if you change some of the component values it might well simulate. I would try changing C2 from a 1nF to a 1uF capacitor. If that doesn?t work try changing L1, L2 or R3.
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Thursday, 23 February 2012
Posted by julia sinclair, Monday, 23 May 2011 on product Solar Garden Light with Battery
  • 0
    vote
    A: It is the voltage on the solar cell that determines if it is light or dark. In the teaching notes that were supplied with this kit is a fault finding flow chart. Assuming that the LED is always on and there is only one fault with the board then the problem will be fixed by checking: R1 for dry joints. R1 & R2 are in the right place. C1 for a short. The solar cell is in the right way around and for dry joints. Q1 for dry joints or shorts. If you are still struggling to get the board to work feel free to Email support at Kitronik.
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Monday, 23 May 2011

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* Required Fields

Physical characteristics:

  • PCB Length: 56mm.
  • PCb Width: 44mm.
  • PCB Component Count: 15.

Electrical characteristics:

  • Voltage Nominal: 1.2V.
  • Current Max at Nominal Voltage: Charge at 50mA.
solar_garden_light_hawkley_hall_01
Gallery Solar Garden Light – Hawkley Hall High School
Solar Garden Lights by students at Hawkley Hall High School.
EPSON DSC picture
Gallery Sun Jar – Hardenhuish School
Sun Jar designed by students at Hardenhuish School using the Solar Garden Light Kit.
Ask Kitronik Sun Jar
Video Solar Light Jar
A video about our Solar Garden Light Kit taken from our Ask Kitronik Live event 2012.
potential-divider-voltage-divider-whiteboard-150
How A Potential Divider / Voltage Divider Works
A guide to understanding how a Potential Divider / Voltage Divider works. What is a Potential Divider / Voltage Divider? This is a simple circuit which takes advantage of the way voltages drop across resistors in series.
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