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2112_large_light_switch_kit

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Light Activated Switch

1.7
Easy Build
Exclusive to Kitronik
Teaching Notes
Key Stage 3
The Light Switch Kit detects the brightness of its surroundings using an LDR. The kit acts as an automated on/off switch (light dependable) for many devices.

Out of stock. Orders can be placed and will be despatched once in stock.

Code1+ 5+ 50+
2112£1.70
(£2.04 incl VAT)
£1.32
(£1.584 incl VAT)
£1.02
(£1.224 incl VAT)
OR

This light activated kit is also available as a temperature activated project kit. The output of theis board can be used to control other electronic circuits, turning them on automatically when it goes light or dark.

The board has space for an LED with current limit resistor (both available separately) which will light when the output turns on.

The Darlington pair transistor configuration allows an output current of up to half an amp to be controlled. Operating voltage 3V to 12V (lower voltages allow for better adjustment of the switching point).

Features:

  • This Light Switch Kit detects the brightness of its surroundings using an LDR.
  • The kit acts as an automated on/off switch (light dependable) for many devices.

Contents:

Possible applications include:

  • Garden light that switches on automatically at night.
  • Draw alarm, which sounds when a dark draw is opened.
  • Line following robot (using 2 light activated boards).

Dimensions:

  • PCB Length: 53mm.
  • PCB Width: 25.5mm.

Requires:

Resources:

Note:

  • This kit requires soldering.

Free samples:

Teachers can order a sample of this kit (one per school) here. You will need to select the kit from a list of all the sample kits; the stock code for this kit is 2112.
Note: this service is only offered to schools for evaluation purposes only.

Buy British:

 This kit is designed and manufactured in the UK by Kitronik.

Physical characteristics:

  • PCB Length: 53mm.
  • PCB Width: 25.5mm.
  • PCB Component Count: 5.

Electrical characteristics:

  • Voltage Nominal: 3V.
  • Voltage Range: 3V - 12V.
  • Standby Current: 0.12mA.
automatic_night_light_moseley_school_thumb
Automatic Night Lights – Moseley School
Gary Haddon from the Moseley School in Birmingham sent us these examples of Year 8 students' timed night light made from our Light Activated Switch Kits. The night light is made from a vacuum formed base with a laser-cut polypropylene shade. Each pupil designs their own shade using CAD so that each night light is unique. He also sent us the photos of the giant model he made, which the teachers use a teaching aid, we think it's a great idea!
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Gallery Garden Night Light – Kitronik
An example of a Garden Night Light.
miniature-automatically-stopping-boat-fernwood-comprehensive_01
Gallery Miniature Automatically Stopping Boat – Fernwood Comprehensive School
Miniature Automatically Stopping Boat designed by students at Fernwood Comprehensive School.
potential-divider-voltage-divider-whiteboard-150
How A Potential Divider / Voltage Divider Works
A guide to understanding how a Potential Divider / Voltage Divider works. What is a Potential Divider / Voltage Divider? This is a simple circuit which takes advantage of the way voltages drop across resistors in series.
line_follower_thumb
How to Make a Line Following Buggy (Using 2 Light Activated Boards)
Learn how to make a Line Following Buggy (using 2 Light Activated Boards) in our easy to follow tutorial.
draw_alarm_thumb
How to Make a Drawer Alarm
Learn how to make a Drawer Alarm, which sounds when a dark draw is opened, in our easy to follow tutorial.
dark_activated_lamp
How To Make A Garden Lamp That Switches On Automatically At Night
Learn how to make a Garden Lamp, that switches on automatically at night, in our easy to follow tutorial.
LDR_thumb
How an LDR (Light Dependent Resistor) Works
A guide to understanding how an LDR works. An LDR is a component that has a (variable) resistance that changes with the light intensity that falls upon it. This allows them to be used in light sensing circuits.

Questions:

Posted by Leon, Tuesday, 18 October 2016 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    Hi Leon,

    Unfortunately we don't do any kits which would perform that task.

    Posted by Rob Haywood on Tuesday, 18 October 2016
Posted by Paul, Wednesday, 31 August 2016 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    Hi Paul, you may be able to use this to switch the DC motor, however it depends on the specification of the motor. The light activated switch kit can output 500mA, and can be powered between 3-12V’s. You may be better using the kit to trigger a relay which is then used to power the motor.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Wednesday, 31 August 2016
Posted by Daniel, Friday, 19 August 2016 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    Hi Daniel, although the LDR housing is epoxy sealed the datasheet for the product doesn’t state that it is waterproof. As such it would be recommended to encase this in a waterproof housing, ensuring that where the LDR sits that it is a clear material to allow light to pass through.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Friday, 19 August 2016
Posted by Jon, Friday, 6 May 2016 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    You wouldn’t need to modify the board, just add components into the correct places. You would add the LED’s onto the output section of the board, and then you would put a suitability rated resistor into R3. This can be calculated on the LED product page, using the LED calculator function.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Friday, 6 May 2016
Posted by Andy, Thursday, 3 March 2016 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    Yes you would be able to use this circuit to power a relay. The circuit can output 500mA and can run on a voltage range of 3-12V.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Thursday, 3 March 2016
Posted by Robert, Friday, 12 February 2016 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    Yes you could use this kit to detect the darkness of a hand being placed in front of the sensor, and the LED would remain on until the light level increased as the hand was moved away. This LED would then remain off until the light level dropped below the trigger point by the hand covering the LDR.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Friday, 12 February 2016
Posted by graham, Wednesday, 16 December 2015 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    Although it would be technically possible to use this kit, we do sell a relay board kit which would be more suitable for what you plan on using the kit for, https://www.kitronik.co.uk/2144-relay-board.html

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Wednesday, 16 December 2015
Posted by fawehinmi, Tuesday, 8 December 2015 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    You would want to use all the same components as what is supplied in this kit, and you would need to use the circuit drawing for ‘Light activated’. The components would then just need to be correctly connected up on the veroboard.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Tuesday, 8 December 2015
Posted by Sam Woodcock, Wednesday, 2 December 2015 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    You could use this board as a trigger by connecting the output of this board to the trigger of a relay such as our 5101 Relay Breakout Board.

    Alternatively you could connect the output of this board to the gate a suitable power transistor, unforunately we don't have any transistors rated to the 850+ mA required for one of these LEDs. 

    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Wednesday, 2 December 2015
Posted by Fahr, Tuesday, 24 November 2015 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    Yes this circuit can be used to turn a light on when light is detected, you would built it up following the ‘Light activated’ build instructions.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Tuesday, 24 November 2015
Posted by Dave Hill, Thursday, 2 July 2015 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    Yes this circuit can be powered by a USB lead, the board can handle up to 9V. However this kit doesn’t come supplied with an LED, you may be better using the 2120 dark activated night light kit. The LED on the 2120 is the same as the one supplied on the 2131 kit which is another version of 2132.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Thursday, 2 July 2015
Posted by Graham henson, Wednesday, 11 February 2015 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    It is difficult to say, i would need more information about the circuit to be sure. If you wish you can email more details to support@kitronik.co.uk

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Wednesday, 11 February 2015
Posted by Kaare Dorman, Thursday, 20 November 2014 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    Hi, it could be used to power a 5V relay. However since the board can output 500mA and an average super bright LED uses about 25-35 mA you could easily run 12 such LEDs from the dark activated switch without the need for a relay.

    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Thursday, 20 November 2014
Posted by Bob, Wednesday, 1 October 2014 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A: Hi, the maximum output current of the dark activated switch is 500mA so if you need more current than that for your CCT it won't work. You could add a 500mA fuse to protect the switch if you wanted. If you add an LED remember that with 12V you will need a current limiting resistor to prevent the LED from drawing too much current and being destroyed.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Wednesday, 1 October 2014
Posted by J Partington, Monday, 23 June 2014 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A: Any buzzer with a driver will work as long as it runs from 3 to 10V and has a suitable battery voltage across it. Remember you lose 0.9V across the transistors so if you want 3V on the output you need 3.9V worth of batteries.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Monday, 23 June 2014
Posted by Jim, Wednesday, 6 February 2013 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A: I have updated the product description on the website to include a link to the teaching material, which includes the circuit diagram.
    Posted by Aaron Sturman on Wednesday, 6 February 2013
Posted by David Johnston, Tuesday, 25 September 2012 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A: You can use any LED with the board. The resistor that is used will depend on the LED you have chosen and the voltage that the board is operating off. Let?s take an example of a standard red LED, where the board operates from two AA batteries: All LEDs have a forward voltage drop, for a standard LED this will be about 1.8V. The light switch circuit uses transistors in a Darlington pair configuration and this has a drop of 0.9V across it. Therefor it stands to reason that if the supply voltage is 3V and there is 1.8V dropped across the LED and 0.9V dropped across the Darlington pair then there must be 0.3V dropped across the resistor. A typical current for an LED is 10mA (or 0.01A). From Ohms law we know that R = V/ I so in this case R = 0.3 / 0.01 = 30 ohms or the nearest preferred E6 value of 33 ohms. A red LED with 3 AA batteries would require a 150 or 220 ohm resistor A white LED with 3 AA batteries would require a 100 ohm resistor
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Tuesday, 25 September 2012
Posted by Les Pettitt, Wednesday, 18 July 2012 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A: Although we do some kits in a pre-assembled version this isn?t one of them. The board can be configured to be activated by light or by dark and this is done by placing the components in different places. This would mean having two different version of the assembled board. So unfortunately the answer is no we don?t do them preassembled.
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Wednesday, 18 July 2012
Posted by Simon, Tuesday, 29 May 2012 on product Light Activated Switch
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    A: Yes it is possible to put a colour changing LED on the board, in fact because a lot of people do this we have a kit that includes the colour changing LED and a battery cage. If you have a look on the related items on the left it is the dark activated colour changing LED kit you need.
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Tuesday, 29 May 2012
Posted by Mark Ford, on product Light Activated Switch
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    A:

    Hi Mark, The only way that you can make sure that it won’t fluctuate around a threshold and give issues is to use a circuit with hysteresis. Unfortunately we don’t have any circuits with hysteresis so we can’t offer a suitable item. However if you put “hysteresis op amp circuit” into a search engine you should be able to obtain the information required to design a circuit.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Wednesday, 19 April 2017

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