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Rear Bike Light Project Kit

2.1
Easy Build
Exclusive to Kitronik
Teaching Notes
Key Stage 3
The Rear Bike Light Kit has just 10 parts, making it a good introduction to Electronics. The kit uses two Ultra Bright Red LEDs: flash rapidly; highly visible.

Availability: In Stock.

Code1+ 5+ 50+
2106£2.10
(£2.52 incl VAT)
£1.47
(£1.764 incl VAT)
£1.15
(£1.38 incl VAT)
OR

This easy build bike light kit has just ten parts, making it a good introduction to electronics. The kit uses two ultra bright red LEDs, which flash rapidly, providing a highly visible light. Making it ideal for use as a rear bike light.

Alternatively it can be used as a night safety product or flashing eyes.

Features:

  • Easy build kit making a great introduction to electronics.
  • Great visibility for night time safety.

Contents:

Dimensions:

  • Length: 48.5mm.
  • Width: 25.5mm.

Requires:

Resources:

This easy build bike light kit has just ten parts, making it a good introduction to electronics. The kit uses two ultra bright red LEDs, which flash rapidly, providing a highly visible light. Making it ideal for use as a rear bike light.

Alternatively it can be used as a night safety product or flashing eyes.

Caution:

  • This is an educational kit and should be used in conjunction with a commercially available bike light.

Free samples:

Teachers can order a sample of this kit (one per school) here. You will need to select the kit from a list of all the sample kits; the stock code for this kit is 2106.
Note: this service is only offered to schools for evaluation purposes only.

Buy British:

 This kit is designed and manufactured in the UK by Kitronik.

Physical characteristics:

  • PCB Length: 49mm.
  • PCB Width: 25mm.
  • PCB Component Count: 10.

Electrical characteristics:

  • Voltage Nominal: 3V.
  • Voltage Range: 2-4V.
  • Current Max at Nominal Voltage: 15mA.
EPSON DSC picture
Gallery Door Sign – Hardenhuish School
LED Door Signs designed by year 7 Systems & Control students at Hardenhuish School.
keep_out_door_warning_signs_west_exe_technology_college_01
Gallery ‘Keep Out’ Door Warning Signs – West Exe Technology College
'Keep Out' Door Warning Signs designed by students at West Exe Technology College.
night_safety_devices_beverley_high_school_01
Gallery Night Safety Devices – Beverley High School
Night Safety Devices designed by students at Beverley High School.
Bike Light assembly
Video Rear Bike Light Project Kit Assembly
Rear Bike Light Project Kit assembly video.
Bike Light demo and explanation
Video Rear Bike Light Project Kit Demo and Explanation
Rear Bike Light Project Kit demo and explanation video.
Bike Light demo
Video Rear Bike Light Demo
Rear Bike Light Project Kit demo video.

Questions:

Posted by Richard Craig, Monday, 11 April 2016 on product Rear Bike Light Project Kit
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    Increasing the voltage won’t provide a longer battery life. You would need to increase the capacity of the battery, a standard 9V battery generally has around 500mAh, a standard AA battery can have between 1200-2500mAh depending on the battery. The kit draws around 15-20mA so a 9V battery would last 20-25 hours, on an AA battery it would last 60 hours. The best option is to go for a high end AA battery, some rechargeable batteries can be around 2700mAh so would give you the longest battery life.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Monday, 11 April 2016
Posted by Philip Jones, Monday, 26 October 2015 on product Rear Bike Light Project Kit
  • 0
    vote
    A:

    The only example enclosures we have are shown in the media section on the product page. However as the items were developed by school students we don’t have any design plans for the enclosures.

    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Monday, 26 October 2015
Posted by Domby, Tuesday, 28 August 2012 on product Rear Bike Light Project Kit
  • 0
    vote
    A: A good quality set of AA batteries will give you a capacity of 1500mA/h. The kit takes approximately 10mA so will last about 150 hours which is about a week. The only way you will get the battery life up is to have the LED on very briefly compared to the amount of time it is off. If you have an LED on for a tenth of a second every 5 seconds then it will use a fiftieth of the power. At which point it should work for about a year. I couldn?t guarantee it would work with the bike light kit. We don?t however do anything that would do this but it could be implemented with a 555 timer or a PIC microcontroller. However if you plan on doing it you will need to consider that the IC is going to take some current and make sure this is kept to a minimum. i.e. PIC chips have a low power sleep command and 555 timers are also available in a low current version. website It may be possible (but I?ve not tried) to remove LED2 and then increase the value of R2 and/ or C2. If this does work then I suspect that as the LED turns on / off that it will fade up / down as the transistor is working at the switching point. It therefore might not give the current saving you?re looking for.
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Tuesday, 28 August 2012
Posted by graham, Wednesday, 21 March 2012 on product Rear Bike Light Project Kit
  • 0
    vote
    A: Yes if you use a CR2032 coin cell it can deliver up to 10mA which is enough to run the circuit. It should last for around 10 to 15 hours.
    Posted by Geoff Hampson on Wednesday, 21 March 2012
Posted by Stuart, on product Rear Bike Light Project Kit
  • 0
    vote
    A: Hi Stuart, Yes you are correct if you increase R1 and R2 it would delay the time between the capacitor(s) reaching the required charge level to turn the transistor(s) on and as such the LED(s) on. To work out the approximate delay you would use the formulae for charging time of a capacitor, t (seconds) = R (ohm’s) x C (in farads). We would also recommend increase R3 to 68 Ohm’s as you are using a higher voltage than what the kit is provided with. One of the reasons for the LED’s flashing a little quicker is that you are using a higher voltage so the capacitors are charging quicker.
    Posted by Michael Lockhart on Thursday, 25 May 2017

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